2014

Here are some items to work on this year.

  • Develop Alternative Communication Resources
    • develop resources that reach into neighborhood settings
      • what is needed to cover individual areas (within 2 to 5 mile radius)?
      • resources that are quick to deploy and easy to operate
    • develop ways to use WiFi technology for delivery of critical information
      • most smart phones have WiFi available that can be used with hot spots for localized communications
      • with additional Amateur Radio Operators a resource similar to WiFi called High Speed Multi Media (HSMM) can be used
        • HSMM provides longer range communication via higher gain antennas and higher RF power that is available
  •  Everyone needs a PAS (Portable Asterisk Server) a IP-PBX package that fits in nicely with high speed multi media.  As well as being a able to create its own network without the need to connect to a master database.  With the miniaturization of computers the PAS can be operate with very low power consumption.
    • The PAS will work along with the HSMM creating a local and extended range wireless telephone network.
  • Additional Training opportunities plan on “in person” and online training.

 

 

2013

Wow! Time sure can fly by quickly at times. There’s several projects that are still waiting for funding. Otherwise they are still good to go.


Looks like the 3.3GHz Band will potentially have some new neighbors according to a NPRM that would make 100 MHz of spectrum available for shared small cell use in the 3550-3650 MHz band (3.5 GHz Band). See Amendment of the Commission’s Rules with Regard to Commercial Operations in the 3550-3650 MHz Band, GN Docket No. 12-354, Notice of Proposed Rulemaking and Order, 27 FCC Rcd 15594 (2012).

The Amateur Radio 3.3GHz Band covers 3300-3500 MHz so there shouldn’t be any problems (time will tell).   The challenge is finding affordable equipment that will operate with the 3.3GHz Band.


Everyone needs a PAS (Portable Asterisk Server) a IP-PBX package that fits in nicely with high speed multi media.  As well as being a able to create its own network without the need to connect to a master database.  With the miniaturization of computers the PAS can be operate with very low power consumption.


 

Link

DSTelecom

DARN SIMPLE Telecom going beyond just static in last mile connectivity, communications restoration, and R/VoIP services.  Creating last-mile connectivity solutions and IP Voice and RF Gateways.

DARN SIMPLE Telecom going beyond just static. Creating last-mile connectivity solutions and IP Voice and RF Gateways.  The SOHO, Home Choice and Home Extra Plans are now available. Also the US Cloud / Toll-Free Numbers.

DARN SIMPLE Telecom

2012

So what’s been happening lately?  Still working on the Asterisk PBX and RF Gateways, should have some new information regarding the Communications Transportable System (CoTS).  Looks like the containers (transportable rack cases) will need to be a few more rack spaces in height to fit everything.   Most likely go with a separate power unit so the weight will be reduced some.

Still need to work on the HSMM Go-KITS, they can be included in with the CoTS as well as work stand alone.  The challenge may be finding enough locations to make it feasible especially in rural areas.   But at the same time rural areas can be more conducive to long haul high speed links.

More information on both the CoTS and Go-KITS soon …

Network Configurations

Network Configurations – Let us start out with the very basic Ad-hoc network, in which users connect directly to each other.

Ad-Hoc Network

With the Add-hoc network it is possible to connect more than two stations, if each station is using a omni antenna (all direction) all stations can hear the others when within range.  But what happens when one is out of range of the others?

ad-hoc_multipoint

Forward-Thinking

Forward-Thinking Digital Imagining

1) HSMM capabilities at least in the 70cm band and even in 1.25m band.

2 ) Long range HSMM networks with data/video/voice capabilities. (With products like the Ubiquiti Networks Bullet [ubnt.com] should be able to get some decent range)

3) Low-cost Digital Interface that can plug into any radio with a data port (most new radios have a data port present, plus by regulation {at least for Part 90 equipment} they have to be able to handle at least 4k8 baud data – definitely not high speed, but it lets messaging take place).

4) Compact Rapid Deployment Links (RaDL) based on Asterisk that can be quickly delivered to any location thus providing phone and radio connectivity. ** Come up with a way to do it with the Gumstix Overo boards everything could fit in a radio. Add a Ethernet pigtail on the back of the radio one would have access to local SIP/IAX2 phone capabilities plus the radio could provide long-haul capabilities for at least one call to the outside world. Instant dispatch capabilities with the package too, along with intertie to other radio systems.**

The radio itself would work as a link/remote base anyone in the local network could connect through the LAN/wLAN to the RF side to transmit/receive via the radio itself. Plus they would still have local network capabilities. Since the original gumstix/Asterisk package was able to handle 10 to 15 calls, the new package should be able to increase that by at least to 15 to 20 calls.  Attach another wLAN to the RaDL would create another sub-network as well as capability for a second RF Gateway channel.

DARN is near

The Digital Analog Radio Network is near.

DARN defined as “to mend by weaving thread across a gap” that is what is being done. Those that want to see flexibility will go with the DARN approach, as a improvement while there will be others that find it to be just annoyance. DARN definitely fits the new Digital Analog Radio Networks.

Sometimes logic can indeed be simple (send in most potentially linkable exchange).

The Digital Analog Radio Network web site is located at http://darnsimple.net

High Speed Multi Media (HSMM)

High Speed Multi Media (HSMM) is often referred to as being the Hinternet (Ham Internet), as it is primarily used under FCC Rules & Regulations Part 97. Under Part 97 commercial off-the-shelf equipment can be used at higher power and higher gain than the more common Part 15 802.11a/b/g operations.

The primary purpose for HSMM and Hinternet is to augment emergency communications via long range high speed wireless data networks that can handle voice, data and video communications. HSMM can also be used in the day-to-day aspects of Amateur Radio Communications.

The Fit

With the rapid expansion of Asterisk PBX into the relm of radio communications the added flexibility of having a wireless linking system has also expanded.

It is now possible to have a network of repeaters and link stations that never touch a standard public switched telephone network, yet at the same time this network of repeaters and link stations has all the standard features one will expect to find with any telephone system.

By integrating HSMM along with Asterisk PBX a truly transportable network can be delivered to any location where communications is needed, with voice, data and video all being available to the agencies and organizations being supported.